US-China trade dispute slows the solar success story.

REWworld.com: “Next week, the International Trade Commission (ITC) plans to announce its initial decision regarding the expansion of the trade restrictions on imported Chinese, Taiwanese and other solar cells and modules in response to a complaint filed by SolarWorld earlier this year.”
“This decision comes on the back of a previous finding in 2012 that imposed both anti-subsidy and anti-dumping tariffs on Chinese-manufactured solar cells. Barring an eleventh-hour agreement to settle the claim, the solar industry in the U.S. is going to suffer from this litigation. And unless this trade dispute is settled soon, both sides will lose out.
In the last five years, the installed cost of PV solar has dropped about 75 percent, driven largely by the falling price of solar cells as a result of major increases worldwide in polysilicon manufacturing capacity and in Chinese cell and module manufacturing capacity.  These rapid cost reductions set the stage for an incredible industry expansion here in the U.S. We’ve ridden this cost reduction wave and grown into an industry employing nearly 150,000 people in all 50 states. The decline in module prices was simply the catalyst for cost reductions all across the value chain.
Two years ago, the price of modules was about 68 cents per watt, and represented about 30 percent of the total cost of medium to large scale distributed generation (DG) solar PV projects. Many in the industry predicted that by the end of 2014, that price would be down to 50-55 cents per watt and we’d be well on our way to a DG cost of about a dollar and 75 cents. With numbers like that, solar is able to compete with traditional sources of energy, even without considering the greater environmental impacts. Unfortunately, we are just not there. In fact, module cost has recently risen to around 78 cents a watt!
This litigation and the uncertainty of this situation has caused has quite frankly sapped the strength of the industry. In response to the ITC’s first ruling in 2012 that mandated tariffs as high as 250 percent on Chinese-manufactured solar cells, the Chinese government levied a hefty tariff on U.S.-manufactured polysilicon, the raw material from which solar cells are made, and which represents upward of 70 percent of the world’s supply. Chinese manufacturers are now buying less U.S. polysilicon and more from Europe and other areas. The back and forth has triggered an increase in the price of solar modules, one that is in my mind artificially high.”